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20130101
20130131
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KRCB (PBS) 37
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English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> rose: and for most of this hour conversation with the foreign minister of pakistan hina rabbani khar. >> i think pakistan today presents a country which is very clear notice head how it operate with its neighbors and that is to try and build on the trust and then build that trust enough to be able to build a environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: its president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> s. >> from our studios in new york city this is charl captioning sponsored by rose communications >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most foft cuss was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bill its. and
will not be shown in pakistan. distributors there say they're worried about how the public will react. the oscar nominated "zero dark thirty" depicts a cia analyst tracking down the former a qaeda leader in pakistan. u.s. forces killed him in a hideout near islamabad in may 2011. a marketing manager at a movie distributor says many pakistanis sympathize with bin laden and are frustrated with the u.s. military operation in the country. >> there are sentiments of the public towards taliban or towards, you know, osama. and this -- we might hurt -- this film is hurting that. >> last september thousands of pakistanis protested against another u.s.-made film. they claimed insulted the prophet muhammad. more than 20 people died in clashes with police. pakistani authorities have since blocked access to the video-sharing website youtube. they've also banned sales of video games showing u.s. troops fighting terrorists in pakistan. >>> wildlife officials in malaysia are investigating the mysterious deaths of endangered elephants. the thai navy blocked them from landing on soil. it's the latest incident in
's expected to return in the next sever weeks for another operion. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a game changing moment. former sporting hero is winning fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy. >> reporter: the 60-year-old is in pakistan. across the country, tens and thousands wait to hear him speak. he once became famous on the field of pakistan's most popular sport, cricket. as captain of the national team in 1992, he thrilled the nation when pakistan won their first ever cricket world cup. khan later moved into politics, establishing his own political party, the pakistan movement for justice. his clean-cut image won popularity, especially among the underage groups. power in pakistan has traditionally swung back and forth between the two big parties but corruption has left the nation's politics in turmoil. voters are increasingly movement for justice is expected to make major gains in the upcoming election. >> they will be wiped out. they will be destroyed in the elections. they will lose so therefore there is a great desire for change. >> reporter: khan's
, thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": bombings in pakistan claim more than 100 lives; the new ability to pay mortgage lending rules; political uncertainty in venezuela and hollywood's take on the hunt for osama bin laden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: vice president bidenill send his recommendations to curb gun violence to president obama by tuesday. the vice president held another round of meetings on the topic in washington today. this time, including sporting groups as well as the powerful national rifle association and others. mr. biden said a consensus is emerging for tightening background checks and banning high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> there's got to be some common ground here to not solve every problem but diminish the probability that what we've seen in these mass shootings will occur and diminish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools. >> sreenivasan: late today, the n.r.a. issued a statement saying it was disappointed that the discussions focused mainly on what it called an ag
as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from view
. it has to be better in pakistan. >> 50 immigrants are returning to pakistan today. they are going back home to one of the world's most dangerous regions. the greek government says they are taking part in a voluntary scheme. if you partnership, it has provided the refugees with a ticket home and paid them 300 euros each to leave -- with eu partnership. but muhammed does not feel like he has a choice. he sees this as his only way out. >> greece wants to be rid of us. they want to keep the jobs for themselves. they have become real racists, and they want us to go. >> he had thought that athens would be his gateway to the european union, but the dream did not last long. we join him for his last two days in greece. he now knows that asylum seekers here receive no help from the state, and processing the application can take years. that leaves a lot of refugees with no documentation. another man waited for five years to process this application after he escaped from the taliban. this is how he lived in greece -- schering cramped quarters with three others with no windows -- sharing cramped qu
not resolve the standoff. >>> indian prime minister manmohan singh said relations with pakistan are no longer business as usual. he's criticizing pakistanis for what he called a barbaric act in the disputed region of kashmir. the indian and pakistani militaries fought three times last week along the line that divides them. soldiers on both sides were killed. indian government officials have asked their pakistani counterparts to investigate the deaths of two indian soldiers whose bodies were mutilated. the pakistanis have dismissed the allegations as propaganda. india and pakistan have fought two wars over kashmir. diplomats started talking again two years ago to improve ties. but indians have been demanding that their leaders take a hard-line stance since the fighting resumed. >>> transport safety is a constant issue in egypt. a military train derailed just south of cairo early otuesday. at least 19 people were killed and over 100 injured. the train was traveling from central egypt to cairo carrying 1,300 soldiers. the last two cars detached and derailed. one of the soldiers said there were p
ocean. china has been stepping up relations with india's neighbors, including pakistan, sri lanka, bangladesh and myanmar, by offering them infrastructure projects. india is concerned that china's roving military presence may spread beyond the straits into the indian ocean. a key oil shipping lane. last year, india successfully test fired a ballistic missile with a range of 5,000 kilometers. it can cover most of asia. a military parade in new delhi the day before it tested the k-5. the country seems to be showing off its weapon development capabilities. china and pakistan are bolstering their military cooperation by engaging in joint exercises. while india is steadily upgrading its military on the back of its economic might. if india succeeds in arming its nuclear submarine with the k-5, it will add a powerful option in its military strategy. the country's continuing missile program is likely to start. nhk world, new delhi. >>> developed countries invest billions of dollars in aid every year to help developing nations. it's known as official development assistance or oda. and it c
. i have talked tie range of human rights organizations in pakistan's tribal areas who have argued from their perspective on the ground, civilian casualties are rather minimal. but other than some sporadic conversations i've had with people in the tribal areas, i think the data we have publicly is limited. >> brown: what does your data show, or people you talk to show? >> two things. one is tomorrow the united nations is going to announce it's appointing a special investigator into civilian deaths by drones a throu is tgetedilli program. so we should be able to get some of the real facts through this u.n. investigation. it's ridiculous that the united states itself hasn't conducted this kind of investigation. of or disclose its results. but that investigation will be done by the u.n. the second thing is general mcchrystal just earlier this month talks of talked about the drone program and how-- how th the-- the attacks on civilians and the civilian casualties are cause, what he calls a vis viseral reaction of hatred in th affected countrie the very people we're trying to win over t
pointed at rebels. political turmoil in pakistan deepened today, as the country's highest court called for the prime minister to be jailed. the decision came amid mass protests demanding that the entire government be dissolved. we have a report from jonathan rugman of independent television news. >> reporter: this afternoon thousands in islamabad celebrated their prime minister's downfall. after pakistan's supreme court ordered his arrest on charges of corruption. prime minister roger ashraf, no longer whiter than white and now facing arrest for allegedly taking millions from contract kickbacks. and this was the preacher breaking the news. dr. mohammed l. cadry a moderate sufi claire i can in a pin striped suit. his message of change is to dangerous to him that it comes from inside a bullet-proof metal box. >> this is peaceful revolution. this is democratic revolution. >> in order to... reporter: earlier armed police fired tear gas and light ammunition into the air to keep protestors back from the center of power. afterwards dr. cadry showed the spent cartridges from behind his bullet-
there are people who kill vacinators. >> recently in the middle of december in pakistan, those going out to do the vaccination campaign were attending some were killed if you want north of pakistan, some down in karachi, and that is horrific. it's hard to understand why that's happening. no one's claimed credit. we've gone a month now without much violence. we only have 250 cases last year in these three countries, and so the reason that we're doubling down, erasing a big budget, making sure everybody is committed to this because it's hard. once you get to zero, you dent you don't have to buy more polio vaccines. all those resources get freed up to work on the next big challenge. >> rose: there are three countries left, afghanistan, nigeria, pakistan. >> exactly. >> rose: and what's the percentage of polio casesem year now? >> the-- we had last year the lowest east was under 250. the majority were in nigeria, and the rest were in pakistan and afghanistan. so it's minuscule and away are really, really close on this one. >> rose: is 2018 the number? is that the date? >> we're committing we will
and pakistan. an indianrmy skespson ys the shooting started when indian soldiers on patrol spotted pakistani troops on the indian side of the line of control. pakistani military officials deny the indian allegation that the firing was unprovoked. a gunfight also occurred in kashmir on sunday. one pakistani soldier died, and another was injured. india and pakistan have gone to war three times since their independence in 1947. analysts say the latest incidents may have a negative impact on the comprehensive talks for better relations that resud 2011. >>> students at a university in north korea got a surprise visitor. google chairman eric schmidt. they showed him how they look for information online, by googling it. schmidt visited kim il sung university in pyongyang on tuesday. he traveled to north korea with former new mexico governor bill richardson and seven others. they spoke with students at a university computer lab. schmidt has emphasized that he's traveling as a private citizen and not representing google. some analysts say the visit was motivated by business. north korea wants to pro
laden and headquartered in pakistan probably matter a lot less now than a few years ago but what you have seen is that as we pit al qaeda in the core area in afghanistan and pakistan it splintered outward and moved outward. and now are you seeing, you know, like a virus trying to find a body in which it can find a weak host. it's moving out and becoming more powerful in places like yemen, somalia, libya, now mali. so it's moving further and further a field and there are so many weak states because this is where terrorists te rt. they take root in failed states there are so many failed states in africa it is not just mali there are a lot of other places and now increasingly in north africa too because of the upheavals that we've seen in the last several years. there's very weak states that cannot resist the incursions of these islamist terrorist groups so we are actually seeing an al qaeda which is morphing and changing an remains very dangerous i think but the danger is taking different forms from what it was when it was more centrally run and tightly controlled out of pakistan. that
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
in pakistan. we had to convince the pakistani government and populous that a stable afghanistan not under a taliban rule was in their interest and that the nato istaff mission was achievable because it was one thing for the pakistanis to generally wish we would succeed but in the summer of 2009 they didn't believe we could or would andthey we hedging their bets to avoid paying the price if we didn't. of course we had to affect the american populous. we had to show parents where their sons and daughters were in a very difficult war a long way away. the first thing we had to was change people's attitude and say this is a new ball game. we're going to do this more seriously. we are going to do this right. we are going to focus and we are going to take everybody's interests into account. we can succeed and we will succeed. >> rose: success would be defined as? >> an afghanistan that could defend it'own sovereignty. did t thinkt was our mission to craft a perfect afghanistan. i thought it was our aspiration, our goal to create a strong enough afghan security force, stable enough relations wit
. egyptian president has agreed to >>> pakistans have seen one of their bloodiest days in years. they wounded more than 250. a suicide bomber detonated his explosiv explosives. police arrived at the scene. then a car bomb exploded. police say 56 people were killed. 116 wounded. a militant group issued a statement claiming responsibility for the attack. a roadside bomb exploded earlier in the day. it killed at least 12 people. in separatist group claims responsible saying they were targeting security forces. a bomb killed 23 people at a religious gathering in the swat valley. the motives are not clear. government officials say 40,000 people have been killed in terrorist attacks over the last ten years. >>> egyptian president morsi has agreed to cooperate with iran to call on syria's government and opposition forces to halt fighting. morsi met iranian foreign minister in cairo on thursday. like the united states and gulf nations egyptian is urging assad to resign and supports the opposition but iran is backing the assad administration with russia. after the meeting they held a news conference.
for catching up. then there are pakistan, bangladesh, vietnam. many countries in asia. i'm quite optimistic about the long determine growth prospect of asia as a whole. >> reporter: the asian economy has stayed relatively firm despite a recession in europe in the slowdown in the u.s. he points out more cooperation is needed in the region to prepare for further head winds. >> i think they should call it more to try to stabilize interregional relationship. we will continue to be our strengths and activities in the area of cooperation. >> japan'sew government has pledged more to myanmar to help economic development. japan's finance minister was in the capital to meet myanmar's president. aso met finance and revenue minister. >> translator: we hope to maintain good bilateral relations just like our predecessors. >> japan is considering more loans an grants. that's to help improve business infrastructure such as power and water systems. japan plans to play a leading role in building the special economic zone near myanmar's largest city. they hope mor japanese businesses wl setp in t area. more b
in washington on friday. mass protests were held in islamabad, pakistan, today demanding new election reforms. thousands of supporters of an outspoken muslim cleric gathered in the capital amid heavy security. they called for an end to government inefficiency and corruption. to the south, there were funerals for many of the 86 shiites killed in last week's bombings in quetta. thousands of shiites had refused to bury the dead until the provincial government was dismissed. syrian women now cite rape as a primary reason for fleeing their war-torn country. that's according to a new report by the international rescue committee. it says women report being sexually assaulted and raped, often in public and in front of family members. the i.r.c. gathered the data by interviewing more than 240 women in refugee camps in jordan and lebanon. the u.n. has registered more than 600,000 syrian refugees. in china, the people of beijing suffered through another day of severe smog, and for the first time government officials openly acknowledged the problem. the pollution was at its worst over the weekend, keepin
for the administration on several occasions. >> rose: syria, for example. >> pakistan, syria, other places. and i suspect that president obama is not gng to see in senator john kerry as much of an independent operator as we saw with, say, secretary clinton who pressed very hard with bob gates for a much more muscular expansion of the surge in afghanistan. she pressed very hard for the libya intervention. and i'm -- it's not clear to me yet that secretary kerry, if he is confirmed, would necessarily press as hard as she did on those issues. he may well surprise us on that. >> rose: she has high public marks for wh she did as secretary of state. among the foreign policy people, what do they look at as her principal accomplishment? >> i think that the public marks have been a little bit higher, charlie, than what you hear from within the foreign policy community. that's usually the case in these cases. certainly when she went around the world she was a star in her own right. she certainly stood for a number of women's rights issues that are near and dear to her heart. but it was interesting out of this whi
prison. david headley scouted out the targets for islamist militants from pakistan. the assault killed more than 160 people, including six americans. headley could have gotten life in prison, but federal prosecutors in chicago asked for a more lenient sentence, citing his cooperation. the united nations opened a special investigation today into drone warfare. it will focus civilian casualties resulting from strikes aimed at suspected terror cells. under president obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate
rather have part-time work. >> i want to -- you are new to the panel, welcome. you were born in pakistan, you lived all over the world, do you see america, the u.s. as falling behind i terms of a leadership position it may have had in the world in terms of the most advanced country for women say 20 years ago? >> i think as pakistani-american this country has opportunities for everybody. but -- and i also see women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyo part-time work so i totall agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am running a
rocked pakistan today leaving nine dead and dozens wounded. in the northwest, gunmen ambushed a van in the town of swabi, killing five female teachers and two aid workers. it followed a series of militant attacks targeting anti-polio workers. to the south, a bomb exploded near a large political rally in karachi. at least four people died there, and dozens were hurt. the number of civilian deaths in iraq rose in 2012 for the first time in three yea. the human rights group iraq body count reported today there were 4,471 civilians killed, up more than 400 from the year before. the group said it shows iraq remains in a state of "low-level war" with insurgents. the state of pennsylvania will sue the n.c.a.a. over sanctions against penn state university in the child sexual abuse scandal that rocked the school. the penalties include a $60 million fine to finance child abuse prevention grants nationwide. governor tom corbett said today the state wants a federal court to guarantee that all of the money is spent in pennsylvania. the university agreed to the sanctions last july. those are some
to afghanistan, pakistan is where al qaeda is today. the president, on over 300 occasions, has authorized strikes to kill al qaeda on one side of the mountain and we're trying to keep them from coming in on the other side back into afghanistan. and to leave that place open would hurt our own security so i don't want to stay there for the sake of the afghans but i want to leave enough of our special operations forces there so they can strike wherever they have to and we can't do that ieull out tirey. >> celeste ward gventer, why doesn't that make sense? >> well, i think you have to consider whether, if we left 20,000 or nine thousand or 3,000 troops there, when does it end? when is this over? it seems like a recipe for just staying there, disrupting these groups in perpetuity, and it's not clear to me that advances what is ultimately a complete kel problem in afghanistan. it's no at military problem. also, our presenceay be creang what is called a moral hazard. states in the region and political groups in afghanistan are precisely not reaching the accommodation they need to reach because we're th
yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year long conflict has reached more than 60,000. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: a pro-government tv
a bit of controversy. one was he said if i have a high value target al qaeda target in pakistan, i'm going to go after that target. you know, i want the cooperation of the pakistanies but we're going go after that target. that created a big stir. on another occasion. >> yes, and that was the yet civil, of course. but then the second one was when he said that he was willing to sit down with hostile leaders. and that he is side a strong country doesn't hesitate to talk. and that created quite a stir. this was during the campaign. >> yes, it actually started before hillary. i mean with all-- joe biden was one of the candidates. a number of other candidates. but you know, when you look back, it was clear that he had thought through these things because they helped, you know, they an nature-- animated some of the decisions that he made later. people asked me what is the most salient quality of barack obama. and there are many. but consistency is a great-- you know, you look back at the things that he has said over theear, and there aren't a lot of mysteries about the decisions that he m
, pakistan, north korea whh hashe bomben like iran and that is just ticking away. there's the egypt problem, there's what's going on recently in algeria and so forth. so i think the theme here for president obama is going to have to be i need to smoke the peace pipe domestically in this country with the political opposition and i need to work and develop friendships abroad and develop some overall strategy for dealing with this very dangerous lull. >> rose: just drill down on that temperament for the president who had an overwhelming electoral victory. >> i think franklin roosevelt would have disagreed. he said the election of 1936 was a great landslide and gave him the opportunity to define his opposition during that campaign. he said they're unanimous in their hate for me and i welcome their hatred, the economic royalists. so i think what roosevelt would have said on the other side would have been if you begin to define them before americans reach their own conclusion that can be a big weapon especially for a second term president who is going to encounter these institutional constraints.
countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees, take questions, be very visible. as secretary, she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confir
in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, rst-time claims founemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> reporter: for john kerry, it was a day long in coming. the diplomat's son, veteran senator, and former democratic presidential nominee has been considered a potential secretary of state for years. >> you've almost lived your entire life for this moment. >> reporter: indeed, kerry first appeared before the senate foreign relations committee in 1971, as a vietnam veteran challenging senators over the war. >> we cannot fight communism all over the world and
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)